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Updated: 9 September 2018

Missionary in Africa, born in Bodminland, Cornwall on 22 May 1856, the son of a miner, who for a time took his family to Ayrshire in search of work, He was converted in 1868. By December 1874 he was pitman employed as a hewer and living at Moorsley, Co Durham, where his family had recently changed their allegiance from the Wesleyans back to the Bible Christians. In December 1874 he became a local preacher on trial and then March 1876 offered for its ministry after having spent fifteen months in the Cleveland Mission at Brotton. He spent a year at Shebbear College and served three BC circuits 1877-1880. His third circuit was Chesterfield, and, not unlike Co Durham, the small Bible Christian community was on a coalfield. It collapsed in 1880 before he was received into full connexion.

He appears to have come to the notice of the UMFC and was employed as a hired local preacher in the Oxford UMFC Circuit. In 1883 he was accepted for the itinerant ministry at his third attempt. He was immediately appointed as a probationer to Freetown, Sierra Leone, where on arrival he found himself the acting Superintendent, due to the illness of Thomas Truscott (1848-1888; e.m. 1867). After furlough in 1887 he was appointe to Kenya. During a time of drought and local warfare in 1889-1890, he not only administered a famine fund raised at home, but supplemented it personally. He did not marry and made no provision for his old age. Instead he lived on native food and used his resources to redeem slaves.

His last letter asked for six more missionaries. Refusing to return home on furlough, on 27 November 1896 he died from blood poisoning after an accident, while answering a cry for help during the night. He was buried beside Rebecca Wakefield and Charles New at Ribe.

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Updated: 30 August 2018

One of the original founders of Swedenborgianism, was born at Alnwick on 8 November 1759 and educated at Kingswood School, He was the son of James Hindmarsh who was the school’s writing master before becoming one of Wesley’s preachers. After an apprenticeship he opened his own printing shop in London and there his reading led him to become a Swedenborgian in 1782. He died on 2 January 1835.

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Updated: 29 August 2018

Early attempts to establish Methodism in Romsey were inhibited not only by theAnglican presence at the Abbey, but by an Independent congregation which traced its roots back to 1662 and to the Above Bar Independents in Southampton. Wesley's Journal mentions only five passing visits to the town between1766 and 1787, preaching there only once, in 1768. The following year the house of Elizabeth Hickman was registered for Wesleyan worship by Jasper Winscom and John Catermole, but this seems to have been an empty gesture.

An attempt by James Crabb, a freelance evangelist, to persuade the Conference to station a preacher in the town, was turned down. Two further houses were registered in the next forty years, including the house of Moses Comley,which was licensed as a place of worship on 13 January 1800. The earliest chapel was not built until 1813, on the initiative, and initially at the expense, of Peter Jewell, son of a local farming family who had converted to Methodism. Two years later he conveyed the property to a group of Trustees, who agreed to complete and furnish the premises, only to run into financial difficulties which hampered them for many years.

Having been in the Portsmouth, Southampton and Winchester Circuits,, Romsey became the head of a circuit in 1873. The Present Church in The Hundred was opened in 1881.

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Updated: 9 August 2018
Born at Bury, Lancs on 29 January 1814, into a Wesleyan family, he was educated at Bury Grammar  School. At 15 he was apprenticed to a Dr. Greenhalgh who died before his apprenticeship was completed, and for the next six years he worked with his father in the cotton trade. During a revival in Union  Street Wesleyan Chapel he was converted and became  a prayer leader and then a local preacher and was actively involved  in the temperance and total abstinence movements. He gave his support to the Warrenites in 1835 and once his younger brother was old enough to take over the family business, he offered himself in 1841 for the Wesleyan Association ministry and was accepted. He married the daughter of one of its founder members, Robert Emmett. Afte twenty years' ministry in a succession of circuits, he was elected president of the UMFC  at its 1860 Assembly. During his presidential year, he became aware of the need  for the training of young men who were entering the ministry in increasing numbers and he developed a course for them, which led to the establishment of an Institute for them linked with Owens College, Manchester. He was its Principal for the first nine years. He died in Oxford on 22 May 1893.

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Updated: 3 August 2018

President of the Conference, 2015. Born in Rochdale of Methodist parents and apprenticed as a printer, he later joined Pontin’s Holiday Camp at Blackpool as a Bluecoat. He went to Cliff College in 1977, was accepted for presbyteral ministry in 1980 and trained at Wesley College Bristol. He married Laura Vipan in 1982. After serving in Preston (1983-89) and St Ives, Cornwall (1989-98) he was appointed Cornwall District Evangelism Enabler and Church Life Officer (1998-2004) and in 2003 he gained an MA at Sheffield in Evangelism Studies. He was appointed Director of Evangelism at Cliff College in 2004 and In 2008 he was stationed as Chair of the Cornwall District, where he has established strong links with ecumenical colleagues. A gifted communicator, especially one-to-one, and a skilled ventriloquist, his ministry has been devoted to evangelism.

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Updated: 23 July 2018

President of the Conference, 2017. Born inBolton into an Anglican family and brought up there and for a time in Sierra Leone, she became a Methodist through the Sunday School and chapel in Farnworth. She trained as a nurse and worked on neonatal wards before moving to nursing and health management in several locations, always involved in her local church. She became a local preacher in 1992, offered for presbyteral ministry, and was trained at Hartley Victoria College, 1993-95. After serving in Stockport and Warrington, where she was appointed superintendent in 2002, she was stationed as Chair of the Nottingham and Derby District in 2010. She has served on numerous connexional committees and ecumenical groups, including the Methodist Council and the Strategy and Resources Committee, has been actively involved with Easter People and has promoted Fresh Expressions in each of her appointments. She married John Mellor in 1975.

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Updated: 23 July 2018

President of the Conference 2016, was born in Otley and grew up in Pudsey. He attended Priesthorpe School and Salt Grammar School and read mathematics at Newcastle University, offering for presbyteral ministry in his second year. On completing his first degree he was sent to TheQueen’s College, Birmingham, where he studied for the BA, followed by an MA in theology under Professor [[Entry:3109 Frances Young]] for which he was awarded the departmental prize for an MA by research. In addition to circuit appointments in the West Midlands, Liverpool and St. Albans, he worked for three years part-time on the ‘Theology for All’ project for the Division of Ministries (1983-86), was appointed Director of the Open Learning Centre (1987-99) and Director of the Wesley Study Centre, Durham (1999-2010). In Durham he completed a Doctorate in Education (2002) and in 2010-11 was the William Leech Research Fellow at Durham University. He was stationed as Chair of the West Yorkshire (since 2017 Yorkshire West) District in 2011. He is married to Marion, whom he met at Newcastle.

Publications include: Learning for Ministry: Making the Most of Study and Training (2005) (with Steve Croft), The Reflective Disciple (2009), Disciples Together: Discipleship, Mission and Small Group (2014).

Sources;

[d. of b. for reference 5 April 1953]

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Updated: 22 July 2018

Born 1971, the, daughter of John S Lampard (e.m. 1967), she read modern history at Pembroke College, Oxford (1989-94, BA, MA). She has always had a commitment to social and political issues, volunteering at the Lambeth Walk-in Centre (1989), serving on Social Work Committee of theWest London Mission (1995-2000) and running the policy and education department of the Catholic Housing Society over the same period. In 2000 she was appointed Secretary for Parliamentary Political Affairs for the Methodist Church, and in 2006 was appointed Policy Advisor for the Joint (Methodist, Baptist, United Reformed and (since 2015) Church of Scotland) Public Issues Team, becoming team leader in 2008. From 2006 to 2015 she was a Commissioner with the Gambling Commission and is currently a member of the Responsible Gambling Strategy Board. In 2016 she was appointed MBE for services to gambling and was Vice-President of the Conference that year. She married Steve Walker in 2000.


[d. of b. for reference 21 February 1971]

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Updated: 21 July 2018

Barber, Jill (1953 - ), née Barbara Jill Smith, was born into a Methodist family in Croydon and grew up in Petts Wood, Kent. After education at local schools she studied English and librarianship at Aberystwyth University, 1971-74, gaining the BA degree. In 1978 she gained a distinction in secondary history in the PGCE at Homerton College, Cambridge, and in 1994 a PhD in information studies and archives at Aberystwyth University. She married Peter E Barber (e. m. 1977) in 1975; they have two children. She became a local preacher in 2015. In her professional career she has held positions in librarianship and related services in London, Cambridgeshire, Hertfordshire and Aberystwyth, and since 2011 has been Director of Englesea Brook Chapel and Museum of Primitive Methodism. She has been a member of various professional bodies including the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals Committee and the University of Hertfordshire Board of the School of Humanities. She has served on a number of Methodist Committees and is currently chair of the One Mission Forum, a Fernley-Hartley Trustee and a member of the Archives and Records Advisory Group. She was elected Vice-President of the Conference in 2015.

Publications include articles in The Ranter’s Digest, Hertfordshire Past and Present, and other journals.

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Updated: 20 July 2018

Born in Codsall, Wolverhampton of Methodist parents, she gained ‘A’ levels in physics, mathematics and chemistry at Codsall High School, and after a gap year at Luton Industrial College, read theology at Durham University, 1979-82, gaining a BA (Hons) and in 1983 a PGCE in religious studies and mathematics at Cardiff University. She married Andrew M Baker (e.m. 1993) in 1983; they had two children, one of whom died as a teenager in 2012. After working in local government she served alongside her husband as a mission partner in St Vincent, 1994-97, and Grenada, 1998-2001. She became a local preacher in 2004, and has served as a local preachers’ tutor, as a member of the connexional Local Preachers and Worship Leaders Studies Board and of the Ministries Committee. She was elected the first President of Methodist Women in Britain in 2011. She has developed an interest in pilgrimage and leads groups to Lindisfarne and the Holy Land. She was elected Vice-President of the Conference in 2017 and Chair of the Methodist Council in 2018.

Her publications: Here and There: Advent Reflections from Two Cultures (1999), Coming and Going: Lent Reflections (2002), Thanks Peter God (2014).

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Updated: 20 July 2018

The son of a farm labourer, he was born on 1 May 1851 at Greave Fold, Romiley, where he attended the Primitive Methodist Sunday School, meeting in an old thatched cottage. He began working in a cotton mill at ten and ten years later was apprenticed to a blacksmith at Gee Cross. Here he began attending the Wesleyan chapel and became a local preacher. He invented the Rowbotham Wheel, used in coal mining and this became the basis of his wealth. In 1887 the Rowbothams moved to Stockport to set up a small engineering works in order to manufacture his wheel, but soon relocated to the larger Victoria Engineering Works, Brewery Street, Portwood. His business acumen saved Broadstone Spinning Company, Reddish from bankruptcy in 1920. He became a partner of Leah & Rowbotham, iron merchants; chairman of Jackson Ltd., hatters and shoemakers, of E. Robinsons & Sons Ltd., tobacco manufacturers and of Andrew Machine Construction Co. Ltd. He remained Chairman of his own company for twenty-seven years. At various times he was also active in the Stockport Commercial Travellers Association.

Associated with Trinity Wesleyan, Stockport, in 1909 he was elected President of the Local Preachers Mutual Aid Association. Knighted in 1921, he received the freedom of Stockport in 1932. He served as alderman and mayor, giving Woodbank Memorial Park to the town. His daughter Florence also served on the council.

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Updated: 11 July 2018

The issue of Methodism’s relationship to the Church of England had been debated by the preachers in Conference since the 1750s, but Wesley’s death in 1791 gave it new urgency in the connexion as a whole, despite (or because of) the ambiguity) of his Deed of Declaration. The first contribution to the debate was the ‘Hull Circular’,issued on May 4th 1791, less than two months after his death, and signed by eighteen leading Hull Methodists. It declares that ‘the usefulness of the Methodists has been and will be greatly increased by their continuance in connexion with the Church of England… We cannot consent to have the sacrament administered among us by the Methodist preachers, nor to have preaching in the Methodist chapel here during the hours of divine service in the church.’

John Pawson among other itinerants dismissed this as ‘a very impertinent, foolish and ill-timed thing’, a matter laymen ‘had no sort of business with’. A number of contributions to the debate followed, including Kilham’s first venture into print, an Address, issued anonymously in Newcastle in 1792.

See also Church Methodists.

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Updated: 6 July 2018

A Women\'s Work doctor in South India, she was born on 5 October 1895 and served in Medak from 1921 to 1959 and in Dornakal from 1964 to 1965.

She died on 21 Decmber 1977.

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Updated: 4 July 2018

John Wesley never visited Aberystwyth and paid only brief visits to Cardiganshire. Since Welsh was overwhelmingly the language of the inhabitants he made virtually no impact and Welsh Calvinistic Methodism became the dominant religious presence in the town and county. Aberystwyth’s first encounters with Wesleyan teaching came through visits by early Welsh preachers. In 1804 Edward Jones ‘Bathafarn’ and William Parry of Llandegai preached in the town. They were joined by Owen Davies and John Bryan. Edward Jones came again in 1805 and a society was formed. This was the first WM society in Cardiganshire. The first chapel (Salem) opened in 1807 and was enlarged in 1842.

Apart from the difficult years between 1814 and 1820, when Conference withdrew key ministers from the Welsh-language work, the Welsh WM society increased throughout the 19th century. The work received a slight check during the 1830s when the Wesle Bach (‘Minor Wesleyans’) had some success in Aberystwyth and a chapel was built in 1839. The congregation became part of the WMA and subsequently the UMFC and UM. It continued until 1911.

In 1869 a second Welsh WM chapel, Siloam, was opened, initially as a branch of Salem. In 1880 a large new chapel, St Paul’s, to seat 700 replaced Salem as the main WM building in the town. A substantial schoolroom was added in 1904. Siloam continued until 1954 when it closed and the remaining members joined the St Paul’s congregation.

During the early 19th century the very small number of English-language WMs were cared for by the Welsh society. In 1845 a separate building was opened to serve as a day school and English chapel. The English society then had 10 members. A new chapel, built with the assistance from the Watering Places Chapel Fund, was opened in 1870. It had seating for 450 although membership at the time was only 60. This served the English society until 1989 when it was demolished to make way for a new building to house both the English and Welsh congregations. This opened in 1992 as the St Paul Methodist Centre and was the only purpose-built church to be erected in Aberystwyth during the 20th century. The St Paul’s Welsh chapel was subsequently sold.

The English society held its own throughout the 20th century with occasional modest gains. At the time of the demolition of the old building and the erection of the new Methodist Centre in 1992 it had a membership of over 150. By contrast the Welsh work decreased steadily from 1910 onwards. In 1910 St Paul’s and Siloam recorded a total of 313 members. By 1991 this had shrunk to 54 and the decline has continued. An additional small English chapel was built in 1954 to serve the residents of the growing Penparcau housing estate. The chapel was sold in 1994 and the society came to an end in 2013.

Throughout most of their history the Welsh and English churches were the head of separate circuits. In 1994 the two circuits united to form the Cylchdaith Ceredigion Circuit, the first bilingual circuit in Methodism. In 2009 this was overtaken by developments within the Welsh District. The Welsh society and the other Welsh-language societies in the county became part of Cylchdaith Cymru (Wales Circuit) while the English society and the other English-language societies in the county formed the Ceredigion Circuit.

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Updated: 27 June 2018

George Mackie and his younger brother James (d. 5 January 1851) were London clock and watch makers on Windmill Hill, close to the Foundery. They provided the clocks in many of the London chapels. George joined the Methodist society about 1770 and was a local preacher for 20 years.

About 1776 he joined several others in re-establishing the Christian Community, a society originating with the Huguenots, for visiting the London workhouse and meeting the needs of the poor and sick. Wesley wrote to him, ‘I approve of your design; let it be well conducted and it will be much to the glory of God.’ He died on 25 October 1821.

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Updated: 27 June 2018